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Art of the Day – 02/05/2019 (View of Toledo, El Greco)

Daily Artwork — “View of Toledo, El Greco, c1599”

Use the images posted in this feature for writing prompts, warm-up activities, drawing templates or as part of an artwork critique.

c1599 — View of Toledo.  Oil paint on canvas. Mannerism style. El Greco (1541-1614). Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY, USA.

“One of only two surviving landscapes by El Greco, View of Toledo is among the best known depictions of the sky in western art. At the time it was painted, it was rare to portray an isolated landscape scene, making El Greco the first landscape artist in the history of Spanish art. It is not a true representation of the landscape of Toledo, however. Although the castle is in the correct place, the rest of the buildings are not truly represented in location or distance to each other. The painting is specifically mentioned in the movie “V for Vendetta,” in which the main character Evey Hammond directs her captor’s eyes toward the painting.” (WikiArt)

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Posted by on February 5, 2019 in Daily Art

 

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Photo of the Day – 02/05/2019 (“Teenage Party”, 1947)

Daily Photo — “Teenage Party, 1947”

Use the photos posted in this feature for writing prompts, warm-up activities, drawing templates or as part of a photo analysis.

Teenagers at a Party, 1947 Tulsa, Oklahoma. Photo by Nina Leen for the LIFE Magazine.

“LIFE reported they ‘munch doughnuts and sip cokes whenever they are not dancing with serious faces to sentimental music.'”

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Posted by on February 5, 2019 in Daily Photo

 

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Art of the Day – 02/04/2019 (Hip, Hip, Hurrah!, Karel Appel)

Daily Artwork — “Hip, Hip, Hurrah!, Karel Appel, 1949”

Use the images posted in this feature for writing prompts, warm-up activities, drawing templates or as part of an artwork critique.

1949 — Hip, Hip, Hurrah! (Hiep, hiep, hoera!).  Oil paint on canvas. Art Informel style. Karel Appel (1921-2006). Tate Modern, London, UK.

“The title of Hip, Hip, Hoorah! was intended to celebrate the artistic freedom from tradition achieved by the CoBrA group. The figures are hybrid creatures, combining human attributes with animal or bird-like features. Appel thought of them as ‘people of the night’, and so gave them a dark background. The bright colours and child-like imagery are typical of CoBrA. Appel often took inspiration from children’s drawings, believing that ‘the child in man is all that’s strongest, most receptive, most open and unpredictable’.” (WikiArt)

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Posted by on February 4, 2019 in Daily Art

 

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Photo of the Day – 02/04/2019 (“At the Fair”, 1942)

Daily Photo — “At the Fair, 1942”

Use the photos posted in this feature for writing prompts, warm-up activities, drawing templates or as part of a photo analysis.

Couple at the sideshow, July 1942 Klamath Falls, Oregon. Photo by Russell Lee for the Office of War Information.

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Posted by on February 4, 2019 in Daily Photo

 

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20 Bizarre Foods From Around the World — Infographic

Bizarre World Eats

Some people are adventurous eaters — or they claim to be, but have they tried any of these delicacies from around the world?  From oysters that really aren’t, unique (to say the least) fish preparations, eggs cooked in pee, and just plain bugs, TasteAtlas put together this list of foods that rank up there as some of the most unusual, bizarre, and sometimes plain gross (to a non-local) foods from around the world.[VIA]

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Posted by on February 4, 2019 in Infographics

 

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StoryMap JS — Maps That Tell Stories

StoryMap JS

Continuing with the cartography as writing theme from the previous Persuasive Cartography post, today here’s a tool for using maps to create a narrative journey through a historical event, movement, or even a fictional story.

StoryMap JS allows students to create their own narrative story line through cartography where they are able to chart a path anywhere in the world using real places, from a very broad jump between nations down to actual street addresses.

Have students use this tool to show understanding of the sequencing of events through history (i.e. the Lewis and Clark Expedition), to better visualize a work of fiction (for example, locations in On the Road), or even to create their own original work.  StoryMap allows students to imbed content from YouTube, Wikipedia, GoogleMaps, SoundCloud, or even original images to tell their story.  This can also be used as a stand alone alternative for collating resources on a topic with the added benefit of allowing readers to view the map and journey taken at the same time.

There are wonderful tips and tricks for helping keep maps stories simple yet informative, and the creation interface is very simple and intuitive as well, making this a great alternative assessment for students as they don’t need to fully learn the tool before applying the content.

StoryMap Editor

 

Potential use in the classroom:  As an alternative to reading, collation of resources, or an alternative student assessment.

Recommended grade levels:  7-12 for creation, but any grade K-12 for simple visual learning.

 
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Posted by on February 1, 2019 in Websites

 

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Persuasive Cartography – The PJ Mode Collection at Cornell University

Persuasive Cartography

We all (or most of us) know about the concept of persuasive writing, as this is one of the major focuses in our Language Arts curriculum.  Getting students to understand the power that words have to influence and sway opinion one way or another or to reinforce already held beliefs.  But what about visual representations of the same concepts?

This is where Persuasive Cartography, or map making, comes into play.  These are not your typical maps that would be found in an atlas or even used to teach basic geography, but are rather intended to send a message to the viewer.  The PJ Mode Collection at Cornell University is an open source collection of 800+ of these maps that cover a variety of topics and time periods and is fully searchable and easy to browse:

What’s also nice is each map in the collection is able to be downloaded for use in the classroom, made into a poster or handout for tabletop activities, and fully sourced for citation purposes.

For more information, OpenCulture published an article detailing the collection and persuasive mapmaking as a whole that you might find informative.

 

Potential use in the classroom:  As a warm-up or discussion activity around historical events in your course, or as a discussion kickstarter for the topic of persuasion and propaganda.

Recommended grade levels:  7-12.

 
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Posted by on January 31, 2019 in Websites

 

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