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Tutankhamun: Anatomy of an Excavation

15 May

Tutankhamun: Anatomy of an Excavation

The Griffith Institute at Oxford University has put together the definitive database of artifacts recovered from the tomb of Tutankhamun in Egypt in an exhibit called Anatomy of an Excavation.  From its discovery in 1922, the tomb of “King Tut” has fascinated the world because of the unprecedented completeness of the tomb, the fact that it lay undisturbed by tomb robbers and archaeologists alike for over 3000 years, and that because of both of these gives us the most complete picture of Ancient Egyptian funeral rites and practices.

Browse the Anatomy of an Excavation‘s database through either the catalog cards or through the original photographs of the artifacts, both in situ and after their removal from the tomb.  This photography and cataloging was also unprecedented in a time when archaeology was more of a treasure hunt than a scientific endeavor.  Also available are the scanned journals and diaries of Howard Carter, the head of the excavation and the discoverer of the tomb.

Anatomy of an Excavation is a treasure trove (pun intended) of information for studying archaeology, Ancient Egypt, or funerary practices around the world.

 
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Posted by on May 15, 2013 in Websites

 

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