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Monthly Archives: February 2014

Art of the Day – 2/26/14 (The Red Tower, Robert Delaunay)

Daily Artwork — “The Red Tower, Robert Delaunay, 1911”

Use the images posted in this feature for writing prompts, warm-up activities, drawing templates or as part of an artwork critique.

1911 — The Red Tower. Oil on Canvas. Orphism style. Robert Delaunay (1885 – 1941). Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA.

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Posted by on February 26, 2014 in Daily Art

 

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Photo of the Day – 2/26/14 (“Abandoned Railway Station, Abkhasia”)

Daily Photo — “Abandoned Railway Station, Abkhasia”

Use the photos posted in this feature for writing prompts, warm-up activities, drawing templates or as part of a photo analysis.

An abandoned railway station in the former Georgian territory of Abhkasia that has sat untouched since the fall of the Soviet Union.  More images are available here.

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Posted by on February 26, 2014 in Daily Photo

 

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The Science of Happiness – Infographic

The Science of Happiness

Most people strive to be happy, even if we all have different ideas of what happy is!  What doesn’t change is the science behind how our emotions work.  We know that the part of the brain that controls our happy emotions is the hippocampus, and it releases a happy little chemical called seratonin that gives us uncontrollable joy when it’s flooding out and the gloomies when it’s low.  What else might have this effect on us though?

Today’s infographic gives you some tips  for staying as happy as you can be and how various activities and exercises can dramatically increase your happiness. [VIA]

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Posted by on February 26, 2014 in Infographics

 

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Art of the Day – 2/25/14 (The Gossips, Norman Rockwell)

Daily Artwork — “The Gossips, Norman Rockwell, 1948”

Use the images posted in this feature for writing prompts, warm-up activities, drawing templates or as part of an artwork critique.

1948 — The Gossips. Oil on Canvas. Regionalism style. Norman Rockwell (1894 – 1978). Norman Rockwell Museum, Stockbridge, MA, USA.

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Posted by on February 25, 2014 in Daily Art

 

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Photo of the Day – 2/25/14 (“Health Inspection of New Immigrants”, 1920)

Daily Photo — “Health Inspection of New Immigrants, Ellis Island, 1920”

Use the photos posted in this feature for writing prompts, warm-up activities, drawing templates or as part of a photo analysis.

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Posted by on February 25, 2014 in Daily Photo

 

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The Lasting Lessons of Mr. Rogers – Infographic

The Lasting Lessons of Mr. Rogers

From 1968-2001, Fred McFeely Rogers entered the living rooms and the hearts of generations of young children, myself included.  There are still many days that I find myself thinking of Mr. Rogers, singing or humming “Won’t You Be My Neighbor”, or remembering some of the funny quirks and lessons that were taught through Mr. Rogers’ Neighborhood.  Today’s infographic is a little walk down memory lane for some, and new exposure to others about the timeless lessons that Mr. Rogers taught us all.  [VIA]

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Posted by on February 25, 2014 in Infographics

 

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Art of the Day – 2/20/14 (Broadway Boogie Woogie, Piet Mondrain)

Daily Artwork — “Broadway Boogie Woogie, Piet Mondrain, 1943”

Use the images posted in this feature for writing prompts, warm-up activities, drawing templates or as part of an artwork critique.

1943 — Broadway Boogie Woogie. Oil on Canvas. Neoplasticism style. Piet Mondrain (1872 – 1944). Museum of Modern Art, New York City, NY, USA.

“Considered Mondrian’s masterpiece, Broadway Boogie Woogie is a shimmering combination of multi-colored grid lines, complete with blocks of color, all in the primary palette. This piece represents another development in the unique style of the artist, which may have been the most profound…This painting represents Mondrian’s seminal work as an artist, and unlike much of his work, is not entirely non-representational. One can see the grid of the Manhattan city streets and feel the beat of the boogie woogie music of which Mondrian was so fond.” (Wikipaintings)
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Posted by on February 20, 2014 in Daily Art

 

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