RSS

Photo of the Day – 03/14/17 (“LBJ Anguish Photo”, 1968)

Daily Photo — “LBJ Anguish Photo, 1968”

Use the photos posted in this feature for writing prompts, warm-up activities, drawing templates or as part of a photo analysis.

In this White House photo taken by Jack Kightlinger on July 31, 1968, President Lyndon Johnson listens to a tape recording from his son-in-law Capt. Charles Robb, who was a Marine Corps company commander in Vietnam.

“President Lyndon B. Johnson listens to tape sent by Captain Charles Robb from Vietnam, 07/31/1968”, Jack E. Kightlinger, Photographer (National Archives Identifier: 192617); Collection LBJ-WHPO: White House Photo Office Collection, 11/22/1963 – 01/20/1969; Lyndon Baines Johnson Library; National Archives and Records Administration. 

 Click image to enlarge

(Source)
 
Leave a comment

Posted by on March 14, 2017 in Daily Photo

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

The Meaning Behind Famous Symbols — Infographic

The Meaning Behind Famous Symbols

We see symbols everywhere, and they have a language and meaning all their own.  From the more established (and famous) as shown below, to the emojis of today, we use symbols all the time to convey messages in a simple, concise way.  But where did some of these long-established and well-known symbols originate and what do they really mean?  [VIA]

Click image to enlarge

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on March 14, 2017 in Infographics

 

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Art of the Day – 03/13/17 (Les Petits joueurs de cartes (Small Card Players), The Brothers Le Nain)

Daily Artwork — “Les Petits joueurs de cartes (Small Card Players), The Brothers Le Nain, c1630-40”

Use the images posted in this feature for writing prompts, warm-up activities, drawing templates or as part of an artwork critique.

1630-40 — Les Petits joueurs de cartes.  Oil paint on canvas. Baroque style. The Brothers Le Nain. Owned by The Royal Collection Trust, Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth, II; on loan to Legion of Honor Museum, San Francisco, CA, USA.

Click image to enlarge

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on March 13, 2017 in Daily Art

 

Tags: , , , , , , ,

Photo of the Day – 03/13/17 (“Coalminer’s Children”, 1938)

Daily Photo — “Coalminer’s Children, 1938”

Use the photos posted in this feature for writing prompts, warm-up activities, drawing templates or as part of a photo analysis.

September 1938. “Coal miner’s wife and three of their children. Company house in Pursglove, Scotts Run, West Virginia.” Medium format negative by Marion Post Wolcott for the Resettlement Administration. 

 Click image to enlarge

(Source)
 
Leave a comment

Posted by on March 13, 2017 in Daily Photo

 

Tags: , , , , , , ,

The History of Income Taxes — Infographic

The History of Income Taxes

On Friday, we posted an infographic on funeral and burial customs — half of Ben Franklin’s death and taxes.  Well, it’s jsut fair that we look at the other half — taxes.  Today’s infographic takes a brief look at the history of income taxes in the United States.  [VIA]

Click image to enlarge

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on March 13, 2017 in Infographics

 

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Art of the Day – 03/10/17 (Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney, Robert Henri)

Daily Artwork — “Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney, Robert Henri, 1916”

Use the images posted in this feature for writing prompts, warm-up activities, drawing templates or as part of an artwork critique.

Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney, founder of the Whitney Museum, commissioned this portrait in 1916 from Robert Henri, leader of the urban realist painters who had shocked the New York art world barely a decade earlier with their images of ordinary people and commonplace city life. By 1916, Mrs. Whitney, a professional sculptor, had founded the Whitney Studio in Greenwich Village, a lively center for the support and exhibition of new American art. When Henri’s portrait was finished, Mrs. Whitney’s husband, Harry Payne Whitney, refused to allow her to hang it in their opulent Fifth Avenue town house. He didn’t want his friends to see a picture of his wife, as he put it, “in pants.” Mrs. Whitney’s attire and self-possessed demeanor were highly unusual for a well-bred woman of her day. In this painting, Henri transformed the traditional genre of a recumbent female—usually a nude courtesan or the goddess Venus—into a portrait of the quintessential “modern” woman. The portrait hung in Whitney’s West 8th Street studio, which in 1931 became the first home of the Whitney Museum. [OBJECT LABEL]

1916 — Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney.  Oil paint on canvas. American Realism style. Robert Henri (1865-1929).  Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, NY, USA

Click image to enlarge

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on March 10, 2017 in Daily Art

 

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Photo of the Day – 03/10/17 (“Garbage In, Garbage Out”, 1943)

Daily Photo — “Garbage In, Garbage Out, 1943”

Use the photos posted in this feature for writing prompts, warm-up activities, drawing templates or as part of a photo analysis.

It’s very interesting to see how little (and how much) trash truck technology has evolved in the past 70 years!

May 1943. “New York. Emptying garbage and trash from Harlem apartment houses.” Photo by Gordon Parks, Office of War Information. 

 Click image to enlarge

(Source)
 
Leave a comment

Posted by on March 10, 2017 in Daily Photo

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,