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Tag Archives: Fernand Leger

Art of the Day – 8/22/13 (The City, Fernand Leger)

Daily Artwork — “The City, Fernand Léger, 1919”

Use the images posted in this feature for writing prompts, warm-up activities, drawing templates or as part of an artwork critique.

1919 — The City. Oil on canvas. Cubism style. Fernand Léger (1881 – 1955).  Philadelphia Museum of Art, Philadelphia, PA, USA.

The city is an example of the ways in which Leger can be seen as the forerunner of Pop Art. The images in The City evoke the chaos of living in a hustling and bustling metropolitan expanse. Small pieces of billboards, store windows and building overlap each other, giving off a sense of chaos, excitement, and movement, creating a scene in which not one single element can be viewed as a whole. Leger, who was a proponent of technology and mechanical prowess, used his illustration of the city to represent the colorful world of modern technology. Rather than being overwhelmed by the advances, Leger saw in them the ability to cure the ills of the post-war world. (wikipaintings)
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Posted by on August 22, 2013 in Daily Art

 

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Art of the Day – 6/19/13 (Three Women, Fernand Leger)

Daily Artwork — “Three Women, Fernand Léger, 1921”

Use the images posted in this feature for writing prompts, warm-up activities, drawing templates or as part of an artwork critique.

1921 — Three Women. Oil on canvas. Cubism style. Fernand Léger (1881 – 1955).  Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York City, USA.

This painting represents a group of three reclining nudes drinking tea or coffee in a chic apartment. While the reclining nude is a common subject in art history, these women’s bodies have been simplified into rounded and dislocated forms, their skin not soft but firm, buffed, and polished. The machinelike precision and solidity with which Léger renders human form relates to his faith in modern industry and to his hope that art and the machine age would together reverse the chaos unleashed by World War I. (MoMA)
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Posted by on June 19, 2013 in Daily Art

 

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