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Tag Archives: war

Photo of the Day – 03/14/17 (“LBJ Anguish Photo”, 1968)

Daily Photo — “LBJ Anguish Photo, 1968”

Use the photos posted in this feature for writing prompts, warm-up activities, drawing templates or as part of a photo analysis.

In this White House photo taken by Jack Kightlinger on July 31, 1968, President Lyndon Johnson listens to a tape recording from his son-in-law Capt. Charles Robb, who was a Marine Corps company commander in Vietnam.

“President Lyndon B. Johnson listens to tape sent by Captain Charles Robb from Vietnam, 07/31/1968”, Jack E. Kightlinger, Photographer (National Archives Identifier: 192617); Collection LBJ-WHPO: White House Photo Office Collection, 11/22/1963 – 01/20/1969; Lyndon Baines Johnson Library; National Archives and Records Administration. 

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Posted by on March 14, 2017 in Daily Photo

 

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Art of the Day – 03/06/17 (War Series: Victory, Jacob Lawrence)

Daily Artwork — “War Series: Victory, Jacob Lawrence, 1947”

Use the images posted in this feature for writing prompts, warm-up activities, drawing templates or as part of an artwork critique.

Jacob Lawrence’s War Series describes first-hand the sense of regimentation, community, and displacement that the artist experienced during his service in the United States Coast Guard during World War II. Lawrence served his first year in St. Augustine, Florida, in a racially segregated regiment where he was first given the rank of Steward’s Mate, the only one available to black Americans at the time. He befriended a commander who shared his interest in art, however, and he went on to serve in an integrated regiment as Coast Guard Artist, documenting the war in Italy, England, Egypt, and India. Those works are lost, but in 1946 he received a Guggenheim Fellowship to paint the War Series. The fourteen panels of the series present a narrative which progresses from Shipping Out to Victory. In the panels, Lawrence adopted the silhouetted figures, prominent eyes, and simplified, overlapping profiles that are typical of Egyptian wall painting. And like the ancient painters, he transformed groups of figures into surface patterns, eschewing modeling and perspective in favor of the immediacy of bold, abstracted forms. In their alternation between vertical and horizontal formats, single figures and groups, and intense action and contemplation, the fourteen panels of the War Series testify to Lawrence’s belief that one cannot “tell a story in a single painting.” [Museum Card]

1947 — War Series: Victory.  Tempera on composition board. Expressionism style. Jacob Lawrence (1917-2000).  Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, NY, USA.
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Posted by on March 6, 2017 in Daily Art

 

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ARC Review — White Death by Robbie Morrison & Charlie Adlard

White Death

White Death written by Robbie Morrison with art by Charlie Adlard. September, 2014. Image Comics, 104 p. $14.99 ISBN:9781632151421.

“For four years, The Great War, World War One, raged across the planet. Millions were sent to their deaths in pointless battles. The Italian Front stretched along the borders of Italy and the Austro-Hungarian Empires, in treacherous mountain regions. In the last months of 1916, a private in the Italian Bersaglieri returns to his childhood home in the Trentino mountain range to find it no longer a place of adventure and wonder as it was in his youth, but a place of death and despair. Amongst the weapons of both armies, none is more feared than the White Death: thundering avalanches deliberately caused by cannon fire… which, like war itself, consume everything in their path...” — Publisher’s Description

This is one of those rare times when I am a little lost for words about a book.  Honestly, I’ve been sitting here for a while thinking about how I wanted to approach this review.  White Death was a wonderfully drawn book, with an intriguing story, but I feel that there was something missing — something more I needed, but I cannot put my finger on it.

White Death was written by Robbie Morrison after the discovery of two bodies in the Italian Alps that were identified as young Austro-Hungarian soldiers from the First World War.  This is one of the few graphic novels that I know of that deal with World War I, and to my knowledge very few books at all cover this theater of the conflict.  In 1915-1916, over the course of five grueling battles, approximately 60,000-100,000 soldiers were killed in the Italian Alps by avalanches caused by enemy shells — The White Death. This is the story of those battles.

Morrison vividly brings to life the despair, heartbreak, and tragedy of war — using the avalanche itself as a metaphor in the sense that it is a terrifying force that consumes everything in front of it without mercy.  The raw storytelling, both in the trenches and in the towns and hospitals behind the lines remind us that war, no matter where or when is indeed hell.  There is a brother against brother element that you do not generally associate with World War I, but in retrospect, I see how this is true of any war.  Also very poignant is the way in which PTSD, or as it was then called – “Shell Shock” was dealt with.  Quite terrifying.

What really stood out to me, however, about White Death was the artwork of Charlie Adlard.  I am relatively new to graphic novels so this is my first time seeing Adlard’s work, even though I have a huge compendium of The Walking Dead waiting on my bookshelf!  As a result I came in unbiased to what he describes in his introduction as nothing less than a landmark book in his career.  The artwork was stunning and masterfully done in a way that was able to capture the intensity and horror of war that Morrison put into words.  The “charcoal and chalk dust” Adlard mentions in the same introduction to White Death seemed to jump off the pages, even through my e-reader, to make you feel dirty, cold, and sweaty with the troops all at the same time.  No other graphic novel has had that effect on me.

My only real criticisms of White Death, and those parts that seemed to have me wanting more were in the fact that I was having difficulty about half way through the book keeping some characters straight in my head, and therefore fully understanding the action and motivations and feelings being expressed.  This could be from my own lack of experience with the genre, but I feel that more detail in the story and the art was needed here.  Also, there seems to be so much potential to have provided more build up and more continuation of the story. I feel as though we were dropped right into the middle of an epic novel and  pulled back out before it was over.  This comes from my not knowing anything about this aspect of World War I, and because of White Death wanting to know so much more!  In a way then, I suppose it served a purpose.

All in all this was an excellent book, and one that makes it easy to see why it has been listed on a few “essential” graphic novel lists.  I highly recommend it to mature young adult and adult readers for the intense story, graphic nature or the art, and the brief nudity and adult themes in a few scenes and panels.

Four out of five stars.

Many thanks to Image ComicsNetGalley, and Robbie Morrison & Charlie Adlard for the opportunity to read White Death in exchange for an honest review.

White Death on Amazon

White Death  on Barnes and Noble

White Death  on Goodreads

White Death  on LibraryThing

White Death  on Shelfari

 
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Posted by on September 29, 2014 in Reviews

 

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Photo of the Day – 3/26/14 (“Women Working in a Japanese Ammunition Factory”, 1941)

Daily Photo — “Women Working in a Japanese Ammunition Factory, 1941”

Use the photos posted in this feature for writing prompts, warm-up activities, drawing templates or as part of a photo analysis.

1941, Japan.  Women working in a Japanese ammunition factory.

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Posted by on March 26, 2014 in Daily Photo

 

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Photo of the Day – 2/19/14 (“Defense Workers Children Play War”, 1942)

Daily Photo — “Defense Workers Children Play War, 1942”

Use the photos posted in this feature for writing prompts, warm-up activities, drawing templates or as part of a photo analysis.

February, 1942.  Photo by Eliot Elisofon, LIFE Magazine

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Posted by on February 19, 2014 in Daily Photo

 

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Photo of the Day – 8/11/13 (Children Running from an Explosion in Kabul, May 2013)

Daily Photo — “Children Running from an Explosion in Kabul, May 2013”

Use the photos posted in this feature for writing prompts, warm-up activities, drawing templates or as part of a photo analysis.

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Posted by on August 12, 2013 in Daily Photo

 

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Propaganda – Infographic

Propaganda: A Short History 

So what do Walt Disney, Adolf Hitler, Dr. Suess, and Pope Gregory XV have in common?  All were exceptional creators of propaganda.  Propaganda is the spreading of ideas, information, or rumor with the express purpose of either helping or hurting an institution, person, or cause.  Today’s inforgraphic takes a brief look at the history of propaganda from the 17th century Catholic Church through the 21st century and the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (North Korea) with a special focus on contrasting World War II propaganda pieces.

Propaganda
Source: WordFocus.com

 
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Posted by on May 3, 2013 in Infographics

 

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